Make Disciples (4) – Breakfast with Jerry Bridges

Jerry Bridges went to be with his savior in 2016, after working for nearly 60 years with the Navigators – THE disciple-making ministry.  In his lifetime, a few of his books became classics – The Pursuit of Holiness, The Practice of Godliness.  Less well-known are his other powerful books which steers readers back to the indicatives of the Gospel of Grace – Transforming Grace, The Discipline of Grace and The Gospel for Real Life. (I’ve highly given and recommended these 3 books to others to remind ourselves that it is all by HIS Grace, and not be MY discipleship.)

Jerry Bridges reminds me of the Navigators with the mission to “spread the Good News of Jesus Christ by establishing life-on-life mentoring—or discipling—relationships with people, equipping them to make an impact on those around them for God’s glory.”

Indeed not only a prolific writer, but one who is profound and perceptive – in the ways and workings of God! I am grateful and glad that the Lord has raised him to remind ‘disciples’ and ‘disciple-makers’ that we must anchor our efforts and energy on Jesus, and the Holy Spirit Whom He sent, lest we lose sight of Jesus and His good news of grace, the power to sozo us in all ways, always.

 

Appended below is a Ryan Habbena‘s account of his breakfast with Jerry Bridges, followed by excerpts from J Bridges’ books.

 

Bridges preaches and teaches Gospel-driven sanctification. The call of conformity to the image of Christ is given throughout the Scriptures. However, it becomes easy for us to become, in Bridge’s words, “duty-driven” rather than “gospel-driven.” To further define, we often see the pursuit of sanctification as something we must do to earn or remain in God’s favor. This thought may be a subtle thought in the believer’s mind. Yet, we still can fall into this erroneous way of thinking. Bridges clearly and boldly established that we are called to pursue conformity to the image of Christ because we are saved. We are totally pure in the eyes of God because what Christ has done on the cross. We are totally secure in the love of God because of what Christ is doing right now—interceding for us at God right hand. 

http://www.signetringministries.org/2009/10/25/breakfast-with-mr-bridges/

 

From “Transforming Grace”

The grace of God is one of the most important subjects in all of Scripture. At the same time it is probably one of the least understood.

The realization that my daily relationship with God is based on the infinite merit of Christ instead of on my own performance is a very freeing and joyous experience. But it is not meant to be a one-time experience; the truth needs to be reaffirmed daily.

My observation of Christendom is that most of us tend to base our personal relationship with God on our performance instead of on His grace. If we’ve performed well—whatever “well” is in our opinion—then we expect God to bless us. If we haven’t done so well, our expectations are reduced accordingly. In this sense, we live by works rather than by grace. We are saved by grace, but we are living by the “sweat” of our own performance.

Moreover, we are always challenging ourselves and one another to “try harder.” We seem to believe success in the Christian life (however we define success) is basically up to us: our commitment, our discipline, and our zeal, with some help from God along the way.

Here is a spiritual principle regarding the grace of God: To the extent you are clinging to any vestiges of self-righteousness or are putting any confidence in your own spiritual attainments, to that degree you are not living by the grace of God in your life.

 

From “The Discipline of Grace”

.. the day when your spiritual disciplines are all in place and you are reasonably satisfied with your Christian performance. Have you thereby earned God’s blessing that day? Will God be pleased to bless you because you’ve been good? You are probably thinking, Well, when you put it like that, the answer is no. But doesn’t God only work through clean vessels? To which I reply, “Let’s assume that is true. How good then do you have to be to be a clean vessel? How good is good enough?”

When one of the Pharisees asked Jesus, “‘Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the Law?’ Jesus replied: ‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself'” (Matthew 2236-39).

Using Jesus’ response to the Pharisee as a standard, how good has your good day been? Have you perfectly kept those two commandments? If not, does God grade on a curve? Is 90 percent a passing grade with God? We know the answers to those questions, don’t we? We know that Jesus said, “Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect” (Matthew 5:48). And we remember that James wrote, “For whoever keeps the whole law and yet stumbles at just one point is guilty of breaking all of it” (James 2:10).

The point of this good-day-bad-day comparison is this: Regardless of our performance, we are always dependent on God’s grace, His undeserved favor to those who deserve His wrath.

 

(I am like the Ethiopian –  Acts 8 30 So Philip ran to him and heard him reading Isaiah the prophet and asked, “Do you understand what you are reading?” 31 And he said, “How can I, unless someone guides me?” And he invited Philip to come up and sit with him”

Jerry Bridges is my Philip!

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