Make Disciples (6) – who is the disciple

So Jerry Bridges emphasized that the imperatives for our sanctification follows our conviction of the indicatives of our salvation – to daily preach the Gospel to ourselves. I have shared often how every church should spend six months in a year to teach what it means to be saved; and we are saved by Grace, and sanctified by Grace.

 

“Performance is the default mode of every human”

We are ever so eager to prove ourselves, to show our commitment to obey, especially the great commission, and to recruit others (teaching them) to obey.  Even before the ten commandments were given to Moses, the Israelites committed to be obedient

Exodus 19: 8 “All the people answered together and said, “All that the Lord has spoken we will do.” And Moses reported the words of the people to the Lord.”

Or in the NT,

Matthew 26:35 “Peter said to him, “Even if I must die with you, I will not deny you!” And all the disciples said the same.”

 

We are ever so eager to please our Lord! But can we truly please Him Who said all our good deeds are as filthy rags.

 

The Jewish people have categorized 613 commandments of God in the first five books of the Old Testament .  ((http://www.covenantpeaceministries.com/resources/Article+-+1050+New+Testament+Commands.pdf). )

And when I googled on indicatives and imperatives, the findings include “1050 New Testament Commands”    ( https://www.cai.org/bible-studies/1050-new-testament-commands  )

 

But I couldn’t find any literature of ‘indicatives in the NT’ (not that I know of)

We are drawn to the imperatives – as performance is the default mode of every human!

 

To contrast how vital it is to be a “disciple”, we highlight the 260 occasions the term is used in the NT (ESV) (72 in Matthew, 44x in Mark, 40x in Luke, 76x in John, 28x in Acts), compared to the 17 times the word “Christian” is assigned in Acts to followers of Christ, while the term  ‘believers’ is used  (18x)  and saints (61x) in the NT.

Surely it becomes persuasive and convincing to declare that God is looking for disciples as the term is so frequently used, rather than the term Christians or believers!

But then, if that is the case, had the apostles failed in making disciples since not many disciples were mentioned in the later period of the NT church?  Had disciples and discipleship faded away and groups are now trying to complete what the apostles failed to do?

 

So who is the disciple?  Continuing on my reading, I found the following resources helpful

 

“One of the best axioms in teaching can be expressed in this way,

Define your terms, then stick to your definitions.”

In considering the subject DISCIPLESHIP AND ITS DANGERS IN THE LAST DAYS, we must first define the term “discipleship”. What do we mean by discipleship? Here we are faced with a problem inasmuch as the term is not employed in any of the epistles of the New Testament.”

(The whole article can be found here    http://www.lifehouse.org/tracts/hgmdisipleshipanditsdangers.htm  )

 

And from  https://bible.org/seriespage/15-discipleship-its-definitions-and-dangers-matthew-231-12

The New Testament Definition of a Disciple

In the New Testament, the picture of a disciple is not as clear or simplistic as one might wish, for the terms, mathetes (disciple, learner) and akoloutheo(to follow) are used in a variety of ways.204

Not only did Jesus have His disciples, but so did John the Baptist (Matthew 9:14; 11:2; John 1:35,37, etc.), the Pharisees (Matthew 22:16; Mark 2:18; Luke 5:33), and even Moses (John 9:28).

There is great diversity among those who are identified as the disciples of Jesus in the Scriptures. John (John 6:60,66) uses the term ‘disciple’ to refer to those who are uncommitted, unbelieving followers of Jesus, motivated mainly by curiosity or impure desires. The masses who have come to faith and trusted in Jesus as their Messiah were also called disciples (John 8:30,31). Then, of course, the term was used particularly and most frequently of the twelve disciples (Matthew 10:1, etc.) one of whom was His betrayer (John 6:70,71). Within the circle of the twelve was an inner circle of three: Peter, James and John (Luke 9:28). In the book of Acts, the word ‘disciple’ seems to be used synonymously with the term ‘believer’ (cf. Acts 6:1,2,7).

What is a disciple? I suspect that Mark summarizes it best in his gospel: “And He went up to the mountain and summoned those whom He Himself wanted, and they came to Him. And He appointed the twelve, that they might be with Him, and that He might send them out to preach, and to have authority to cast out demons” (Mark 3:13-15).

Who is a disciple of our Lord? Anyone who is deeply and personally committed to Jesus Christ by faith, who manifests the power and authority of our Lord, and who continues and extends His work.”

 

And from   https://bible.org/seriespage/2-understanding-meaning-term-disciple

 

DISCIPLESHIP AS A CALL TO FOLLOW JESUS

Discipleship is a call to be with, know and enjoy the Master. In this sense, the call to Biblical discipleship presupposes salvation, i.e., that a person has believed in Christ as Lord and Savior and continues to believe in Him. But discipleship is also a summons to follow Jesus and this is, at times, no easy matter. He demands exclusive, complete, and unflinching obedience to Himself. This is where his summons to discipleship is so radically different from Plato who stressed the freedom of the student from the teacher or even the Jewish religious leaders who focused more on the Torah and steered their disciples away from themselves. Jesus, on the other hand, pointed people to himself9 (and still does) and calls them to radical commitment to him. Jesus’ call to discipleship is a call to Christlikeness which includes at least three related facts: (1) the demand; (2) the added promise; and (3) the grace.

 

THE DEMAND

Jesus’ call to discipleship is an all-or-nothing summons, reaching into every area of our lives. It involves giving him preeminence over the closest of our human relationships and over the desires we have for our lives. In short, it involves becoming his servant in the world and giving your life to that end. Paradoxically we give up that which we cannot keep to gain that which we cannot lose. If we don’t, we lose all in the end (cf. Matt 16:25).

The cross was an instrument of death and well known to the Jews. The suffering was intolerable. But Jesus says we are to take it up and follow him. This will, in the nature of the case, involve self-denial. The one who picked up the cross-beam of his cross was headed down a one-way street, never to return.

The GRACE

The demand of Jesus’ call to discipleship is impossible for a human being, unaided, to fulfill. We must have resources to accomplish this kind of life. Those resources come directly from Christ and are promised to us if we abide in him. This is the point of Jesus’ teaching in John 15:1-11ff. He told his disciples that even though he was departing the world, he would nonetheless carry on his life and ministry through them, his chosen ones (15:16). From John 14:26, 15:26 and 16:13-14 we know that his life would be lived in and through the disciples via the indwelling Holy Spirit (cf. Rom 8:9; 1 Cor 3:16).”

 

 

 

 

 

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Making Disciples (2) – giving up all

I wrote about ‘giving up all’, but only mentioned examples in Acts and the epistles.  There is another account – in the Gospels – The Widow’s Mite.

 

The Widow’s Mite

As I said, one way to understand difficult passages or practices in the OT would be to see how Jesus or the early church referenced and flesh it out. And when it comes to the topic of giving (tithing), Jesus actually did not say much; but He mentioned much about the hazardous preoccupation with wealth, and about the poor.

In the account of “The Widow’s Mite”, many use the account from Luke, where the warning against the scribes and the sacrificial giving of the poor widow was separated by the artificial chapter division.  There is another account in Mark, which brings out the context more.

 

Mark 12  38 And in his teaching he said, “Beware of the scribes, who like to walk around in long robes and like greetings in the marketplaces 39 and have the best seats in the synagogues and the places of honor at feasts, 40 who devour widows’ houses and for a pretense make long prayers. They will receive the greater condemnation.”

41 And he sat down opposite the treasury and watched the people putting money into the offering box. Many rich people put in large sums. 42 And a poor widow came and put in two small copper coins, which make a penny. 43 And he called his disciples to him and said to them, “Truly, I say to you, this poor widow has put in more than all those who are contributing to the offering box. 44 For they all contributed out of their abundance, but she out of her poverty has put in everything she had, all she had to live on.”

 

 

James Matheny wrote about this. It makes more sense when I read the text in context.

Was the account about sacrificial giving or was Jesus illustrating on his warning about religious folks asking people to give, and give?  = by pointing out a widow who in obedience about temple ‘tithes’ probably had sold what she had, and then gave everything she had.

One of my favorite films is “The Book of Eli”.  I first watched it aboard a plane, and had to get the DVD.  That was the impact of the movie on me.  It’s about how the scriptures can be abused to control others   Here’s the review from Christianity Today –

(http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2010/januaryweb-only/bookofeli.html)

Denzel Washington stars as Eli, a lone traveler wandering America’s wastelands presumably devastated by nuclear war 30 years prior.

Carnegie a crime boss is looking to expand his territory and knows that knowledge is power in a world where most people don’t know how to read. His gang searches the area (and hapless travelers) for books to help him gain control. There’s one in particular he’s desperate to find, a book with the power to rally people under his leadership—and Eli just happens to have the world’s last remaining copy of The Bible.

Eli and Carnegie want the Scriptures for very different reasons. Carnegie recognizes that the Bible can influence people’s hearts and minds—a “weapon” to bend people’s wills to his own. But Eli believes he is on a mission from God, following the instructions of the “still small voice” within to protect the holy book at all costs and save his devastated world with the divine wisdom it contains. 

 

Using, or abusing Scriptures?

I remember how my previous church spent months in each year raising money for her worthy projects – yes, they were all worthy projects, missions, church planting, sending out workers.  One Sunday, the appeal to give was transmitted from one of our satellite venues, and we watched the sermon on the screen.  Then I prayed, ‘Lord, close our ears, our eyes to what the speaker is saying, as the scriptures are being quoted out of context’.  (I had been reading up on ‘twisting the scriptures’).  Then the sound system became muffled, and the projection screen began to sway.  Not too sure whether it was an answer to prayer, but anyway, I thought so.

 

So, have I been exposed to much incomplete and distorted interpretations of the scriptures?  How did term “Great Commission” came about?  Or the “Great Commandment”.  What about the “Great Compassion” (John 3:16).  I realized now that these two ‘greats’ draw attention to what we must do, and not what Jesus has done.  Has the church been subjected to a narrow definition of the word ‘disciple’ and various groups of people, in faithfulness, sincerity and personal obedience went forth to make disciples – in their own image!  To ‘hothouse’ converts for the task of world evangelism, a type of special forces, marine corps, rather than just a mere soldier, a son, a sower, a steward, a student, a sprinter, a sibling (to the community) [from the letters to Timothy]?

Or have we been subjected to a rigid nuance of the term ‘discipleship’ and disciple – see https://www.gty.org/library/blog/B130207/what-does-it-mean-to-make-disciples

The text for the Great Commission is taken from Matthew.  Mark stated that it was to “Go into all the world and proclaim the gospel to the whole creation”.  I suppose Luke’s account of this commission would be in Acts 1:8 – to witness to Him.  John corroborated the command in Acts 1:8 when he wrote John 20: “ 24 This is the disciple who is bearing witness about these things, and who has written these things, and we know that his testimony is true.”

 

I have perused the multiplication charts of the disciple-making movements. But I wonder why the fastest growing churches in the world are the Pentecostals and the Charismatics. Maybe there is something I have missed – The Great Commitment of Jesus.  Its not about my discipleship.  Its about God’s purpose in Jesus, God’s plan in Jesus, God’s program in Jesus.  And when someone told me how they fasted, how they prayed – I chipped in – yes, wow, but it is going to be a OMO – One Man Operation, and it is finished. We just follow along, and learn how He did it, how He is doing it – to be a learner follower as John MacArthur explained.

THE GREAT COMMITMENT

Yes, I repeat for emphasis   THE GREAT COMMITMENT

 Acts 1: … 5you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit not many days from now.”

So when they had come together, they asked him, “Lord, will you at this time restore the kingdom to Israel?” He said to them, “It is not for you to know times or seasons that the Father has fixed by his own authority. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses …”

Matthew 28 “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Go therefore ……  And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

 

May the Companion (paraclete) Whom the Lord Jesus sent, our Comforter, our Captain, our Covering also be our Counsellor, so that we can know Jesus